Windows, BIOS, and UEFI — Adios!

I had some trouble with the laptop (an HP x360 13-A113CL) upgrading to Ubuntu 17.04. But something I did along the way gave the Windows an opening to screw me up, and it did. (I have Windows waiting to screw things up, like a Virus you have to pay for and then validate with a license key, sitting there in a dual-boot configuration (unseen and unused since sometime last September). The simplest way to straighten things out was to reinstall Linux. But things keep changing in the hardware-meant-to-run Windows world, so…

The laptop was only half the problem. I was doing some other work on a completely different PC and and wanted watch YouTube videos and look at manuals on the computer next to me. But it was a Windows PC (a Lenovo H535), and it had a weird audio problem where two drivers were contesting over who was in charge of sound output, so I could only get sound with the first video. After fighting that for half an hour, I said, okay, then, time to give this machine a real operating system.

So: here are some notes.

First, the way you get to the “BIOS” options is probably F1. Probably. (HP, Lenovo)

But it’s not BIOS, it’s UEFI and no matter what you do, you’ll wish they’d never come up with Secure Boot, especially if you want Linux.

So you’ll probably want to use Ubuntu Boot Repair.

Ubuntu Tips

How to upgrade to Ubuntu 14.10 from Ubuntu 14.04.

Or, how to get an ISO if that’s your preferred way.

What to do when you finish upgrading to 14.10.

How to watch YouTube on your Ubuntu machine.

Normally, I run Chrome and/or Chromium instead of Firefox, but there’s a new version of Opera too.

Here’s some tools for scanning on Linux.

How to create a UEFI bootable Ubuntu USB drive using Windows.

Or you can just get a Mac and run the all-new butt-ugly Yosemite.